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A common misconception is that you can tell if your dog has a fever by feeling her nose. Essentially, a cool and wet nose is good whereas a hot and dry nose means a fever. This is not always the case.

Why is detecting a dog fever difficult for us to determine? Well, if we take a healthy dog’s temperature, most would automatically believe their dog has a fever. This is because a dog’s normal body temperature is higher than humans.

What Is A Normal Temperature For A Dog?

The normal body temperature for your dog is between 101 and 102.5 degrees F. This temperature is completely normal and means your dog does not have a fever.

How Do I Know If My Dog Has A Fever?

A dog is said to have a fever if their temperature rises above 103 degrees F. Fatal temperature for a dog is 106 degrees F.

Dogs that have a fever may also exhibit the following symptoms:

  • Lethargic behavior
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Coughing
  • Nasal discharge
  • Shivering in a normal, warm environment

How Do I Take My Dog’s Temperature?

The only way to truly tell if your dog has a temperature is to take his temperature rectally. To take your dog’s temperature rectally, coat a thermometer with lubricant like petroleum jelly or baby oil. Then, insert the thermometer one inch into your dog’s anus and wait for the thermometer to beep. If your dog has a temperature above 103 degrees F, you should call your veterinarian. If you notice your dog’s temperature rising and reaching 106 degrees F, you should take your dog to the emergency veterinarian immediately.

How Can I Get My Dog’s Temperature Down?

If you do not have an emergency veterinarian available, you can help bring her body temperature down by applying cold water to her fur. Stop the cooling procedure once her temperature gets back down to 103 degrees F. You should also make sure your dog is drinking plenty of fluids throughout this process.

Also, you should never give your dog any human medications for her fever. Medications like acetaminophen and ibuprofen can be poisonous to dogs and result in severe injury.

Consider Investing in Dog Insurance  

Looking for more ways to keep your pup happy and healthy? Consider investing in a dog insurance policy with MetLife Pet Insurance.1 Get your free quote today. 

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Nothing in this article should be construed as financial, legal or veterinary advice. Please consult your own advisors for questions relating to your and your pet’s specific circumstances. 

1 Pet Insurance offered by MetLife Pet Insurance Solutions LLC is underwritten by Independence American Insurance Company (“IAIC”), a Delaware insurance company, headquartered at 485 Madison Avenue, NY, NY 10022, and Metropolitan General Insurance Company (“MetGen”), a Rhode Island insurance company, headquartered at 700 Quaker Lane, Warwick, RI 02886, in those states where MetGen’s policies are available. MetLife Pet Insurance Solutions LLC is the policy administrator authorized by IAIC and MetGen to offer and administer pet insurance policies. MetLife Pet Insurance Solutions LLC was previously known as PetFirst Healthcare, LLC and in some states continues to operate under that name pending approval of its application for a name change. The entity may operate under an alternate, assumed, and/or fictitious name in certain jurisdictions as approved, including MetLife Pet Insurance Services LLC (New York and Minnesota), MetLife Pet Insurance Solutions Agency LLC (Illinois), and such other alternate, assumed, or fictitious names approved by certain jurisdictions.