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We all want our dog’s oral health to be as good as possible. But not all dogs will accept the fact that there’s a toothbrush in their mouth. How can you clean their teeth without a toothbrush? Can it even be done? Luckily, it can.

Doggy Dental Spray

Your local pet store (like PetSmart or Petco) often sell doggy dental spray. Dogs generally love the spray once it’s in their mouth, even though they may not appreciate the “spray” part. The spray is tasty, freshens their doggy breath, and helps remove plaque from their teeth.

Sprays are usually one of the ‘last’ things to try because they do work slower than other products.

Coconut Oil

Most of us have heard of the benefits of coconut oil for humans but it doesn’t stop there. Coconut oil is a bacteria killer. Rubbing coconut oil on your dog’s teeth and gums can assist with reducing plaque-causing bacteria. The best part? If your dog doesn’t appreciate you rubbing her teeth yourself, you can add the coconut oil to her food, and it works just the same.

Bully Sticks

Bully sticks aren’t just a tasty snack. They’re firm pieces of ‘meat’ your dog generally spends a significant time chewing on (unless you have a wild chewer). Bully sticks help your dog’s dental health by chipping off tartar while chewing.

Raw Bones

This one is something you’ll need to talk to your veterinarian about first. But, if he or she gives you the go ahead, raw bones are known to be very helpful for doggy dental health.

When your dog is eating a raw bone, they’re tearing off connective tissue and chomping down which cleans not only the surface of their teeth but the spaces between their teeth as well.

Don’t use a cooked bone. Cooked bones are not good for dogs in any way. Cooked bones are known to splinter and cause a wide range of health problems.

Time to Get Started

Now that you know you can ‘brush your dog’s teeth’ without actually brushing, you can get started on keeping her mouth healthy. If you have any questions about your dog’s dental health, be sure to ask your veterinarian. If you have an older dog, see what your veterinarian thinks of your dog’s teeth and which option would be best for your individual dog.  You can also consider taking out an active dog insurance policy to help protect your pup's health.

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Nothing in this article should be construed as financial, legal or veterinary advice. Please consult your own advisors for questions relating to your and your pet’s specific circumstances. 

1 Pet Insurance offered by MetLife Pet Insurance Solutions LLC is underwritten by Independence American Insurance Company (“IAIC”), a Delaware insurance company, headquartered at 485 Madison Avenue, NY, NY 10022, and Metropolitan General Insurance Company (“MetGen”), a Rhode Island insurance company, headquartered at 700 Quaker Lane, Warwick, RI 02886, in those states where MetGen’s policies are available. MetLife Pet Insurance Solutions LLC is the policy administrator authorized by IAIC and MetGen to offer and administer pet insurance policies. MetLife Pet Insurance Solutions LLC was previously known as PetFirst Healthcare, LLC and in some states continues to operate under that name pending approval of its application for a name change. The entity may operate under an alternate, assumed, and/or fictitious name in certain jurisdictions as approved, including MetLife Pet Insurance Services LLC (New York and Minnesota), MetLife Pet Insurance Solutions Agency LLC (Illinois), and such other alternate, assumed, or fictitious names approved by certain jurisdictions.